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How to share Wi-Fi without giving out your password

BY KOMANDO STAFF, KOMANDO.COM

Troy Warren for Hometown Hall

 

Keeping your critical data safe can be difficult, especially when cybercriminals keep coming up with sneakier ways to rip us off. That’s why you really need to be careful with your passwords. If a criminal gets ahold of your credentials, they can pretty much do whatever they’d like with your account. Tap or click here to find out how to create stronger passwords.

Many of us are leery when it comes to giving guests in our home the Wi-Fi password. It’s not that you don’t trust grandma, you’re just afraid that handing your network’s password out to anyone could lead to disaster later.

There has to be a better way. Don’t worry, there is. Keep reading for a secure way to let guests use your Wi-Fi network without all the usual risks.

QR codes to the rescue

You can post a QR code around your house, so your guests (and you) can scan it with their phone. It’s a secure shortcut with your password hidden inside. When you need it, you scan the QR code instead of typing in your password.


 

If you think you don’t know what a QR code is, you do. (See photo above.) It’s that odd-looking box that’s filled with smaller boxes, which you may have seen people scanning for discounts at the supermarket.

They became super popular during the pandemic at places like restaurants so that you can view contactless menus.

QR codes are super easy to use and this cool site lets you create them for free.

QIFI.org is an online QR code generator for Wi-Fi access that works with Apple and Android gadgets.

To use the site you’ll need three pieces of information, which you can get from your internet provider. Or follow these instructions:

First, look at the back of your modem for “SSID.” It might be shown as something like, “Wi-Fi Network Name (SSID).” It’ll be about a dozen numbers and letters; type those in where it says SSID on QIFI’s Code Generator page.

Second, choose your secure network type; the site defaults to WPA/WPA2, but you may have WEP. If you don’t know, ask your internet provider.

Third, type in your router’s security key password. You can find the default password on the back of your router or in its manual.

inally, click the button that says Generate! and that’s it. You now have your own very cool QR code. Print it out and post it around the house. The next time you hear, “What’s the Wi-Fi password?” Just yell back, “Scan it.”